Protecting the Lands We Love

Grand Teton National Park

On the north end of Jackson Hole, Grand Teton National Park preserves a spectacular landscape rich with majestic mountains, pristine lakes and extraordinary wildlife. In the winter, the park’s main roadway is plowed and open for winter travel from the town of Jackson to Flagg Ranch near Yellowstone National Park’s south boundary. The Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center in Moose is open year-round, except for December 25th.

Yellowstone National Park

Established in 1872, Yellowstone National Park is America’s first national park. Located 90 miles north of Jackson, it is home to a large variety of wildlife including grizzly bears, wolves, bison, and elk. Preserved within Yellowstone National Park are Old Faithful and a collection of the world’s most extraordinary geysers and hot springs, as well as the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

Bridger-Teton National Forest

Easily accessed by Jackson Hole, Bridger-Teton offers more than 3.4 million acres of public land for outdoor recreation enjoyment. With its pristine watersheds, abundant wildlife and immense wildlands, these forest lands comprise a large part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem – the largest intact ecosystem in the lower 48 States. Offering nearly 1.2 million acres of designated Wilderness, over 30,000 miles of road and trails and thousands of miles of unspoiled rivers and streams, the Bridger-Teton offers something for everyone.

Jackson Hole Land Trust and Nature Conservancy

With 97 percent of Jackson Hole’s land protected as national parks and forests, it’s easy to assume that elk, mule deer, antelope and other key wildlife species have plenty of room to roam between their winter and summer stomping grounds. But Jackson is part of a much bigger, scientifically important region, the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, and the tiny 3 percent of land here that is privately owned is part of a network of critical migration corridors through the ecosystem.

The Land Trust and The Nature Conservancy are on a mission to protect enough open space for the Yellowstone region’s wildlife to get where they need to go. Through conservation easements and other land-preservation tools, they are working acre by acre to protect important terrain ensuring our valley maintains it visually spectacular character and remains open for wildlife.